A Web Site as a Marketing Tool

Marketing Your Business with a Web Site


How to Get Started Using a Website as a Marketing Tool?

What type of business would benefit from having a website?

How We Can Help


Here’s the quick list, for more details see our

Website Planning Guide

  • Define the Objective of your Site
  • Define Your target market
  • Pinpoint a Unique Concept
  • Research Similar Sites
  • Consider Site Features
  • Make a Budget for the Site
  • Consider your Marketing Strategy
  • Gather content
  • Interview developers (with this info in hand!)


Most any type of business can benefit from having a website as a marketing tool. You just need to figure out how you want it to fit into your marketing plan and what you want it to do for your company and the customer. People sometimes come into the website plan thinking they want to simply make sales, when in fact they find it is a better tool for getting people to come into their store downtown or it’s a place to educate a customer as to why they need to buy a product in the first place. Of course, if built well, it can server several functions. Such as…

  • a branding tool
  • to enhance your image
  • to educate about your business
  • to sell products & services
  • to be a live communication tool with your customers


We help businesses assess how a website fits into their marketing goals, then develop a website that will accomplish that. We provide design, hosting, ecommerce and content management packages that let you control as much of the website as you can whether it’s managing an online store, services or educational information. We work on building long-lasting relationships to help you keep your site up to date and working well for your companys as well as your customer.

Website as a Communication Tool

How Can a Website Bring you More of Your Target Market?



It’s this last aspect that is becoming more the norm – the live communication tool. Communication needs to involve two parties, in this case, the company and the visitor. In this way, the site evolves from both sites – the company is involved with updating and changing it, and visitors are involved with interacting on the site itself. Just a few types of interaction include:
  • ordering
  • signing up for events or information
  • by listening or viewing streaming audio and video
  • live chat
  • blogs

Because it has the potential for so much interaction, it becomes like another associate, a person, who works for your company. It represents you 24/7



This depends on two things:

  1. how the site is developed
  2. how you market the site itself

Development: If you know well your target market, develop the site with that user (s) in mind:

  • considering how they will use it, navigate it
  • how they will find you
  • what they expect to see/do when they get there
  • how well they can accomplish those tasks
  • how web savvy your market is

Marketing: If no one knows about your site, it won’t reach your market. Offline and online market needs to be considered. As a very basic example, if your business is selling houses, of course you will want to market your site offline by printing it and communicating the URL everywhere, primarily telling people they can see/tour homes on your site. You will also want to be listed in the local directories on google and yahoo and be found for real estate or home keywords and terms in your area. Targeting the online marketing to your area is what is needed in this example. Trying to be found for “real estate agents” in google would be pointless, but being found for real estate agents in Eugene if focused and doable.

How Much Does a Website as a Marketing Tool Cost Annually?

There are 4 costs to consider in developing and maintaining a site:

  • development costs ($1,000 and up, every 3-4 years)
  • monthly hosting and cc fees ($300 and up)
  • staffing to maintain it (depends on complexity of site)
  • marketing costs (if you hire a company, $3600)